CLJ

How to use the NewCLJ as your English – Malay dictionary

My latest article was published by CLJ under the citation [2013] 1 LNS(A) xvii.


Last year, I published an article titled “How to use CLJ as your English – Malay dictionary”. As explained by the title, it was a short guide on how to use CLJ”s website, www.cljlaw.com, to translate English words especially your legal jargon into the Malay language. The article was published by CLJ under the citation [2012] 1 LNS xxxi.

However, CLJ recently upgraded its website thus the need for this new article on how to use the New CLJLaw as your English – Malay dictionary.

Unlike the previous system, it is now easier to do the search.

Go to the Search Page. Make sure that “Caselaw” is selected as the “Search Criteria” (caselaw is selected by default).

In the textbox “Search Term”, insert the word or words you wish to search followed with a space (for “and”) and thereafter, the word “translation”. Note that the word “translation” is the key to enable the dictionary.

For example, if you wish to search for the words “liberty to file afresh”, you can put the words “Liberty to file afresh” translation. If you want to search the exact words, you will need to put a quotation mark in the beginning of the sentence and at the end of the sentence.

Under “Search In”, click on “Head Notes”. This means that the search will only be conducted on the headnotes of all cases.

After that, click on the Search button.

Once you get the results, click on any of the cases (if any). The results are located in the Headnote section.

You’ll find the searched words highlighted. In this case, “liberty to file afresh” is highlighted in paragraph (4).

Now scroll down to the translated section of the Headnote in particular paragraph (4) of the Malay version.

The Malay translation can be seen in paragraph (4). I’ve highlighted the section for easy reference.

As mentioned in my previous article, this little trick has its limitation. If the word does not appear in any of CLJ’s headnotes, you will not get the translation. However, based on my experience, most words, in particular legal jargon, are available

LegalHack Series: How to use CLJ as your English – Malay dictionary

Other than Google Translate and Dewan Bahasa Dan Pustaka’s websites, CLJlaw.com can be used as a English – Malay dictionary. Although it already has a basic translation function but this has be further enhanced with a little trick I discovered.

Go to CLJLaw case search. In the Advance Search menu, enter the words that you wish to search in the “with the exact phase” column.

In the column “with all the words”, insert the word “translation”. The latter is the key to enable the translation function.

Click on “Search Headnotes Only” and then search.

Once you get the results, click on Headnote on the right side of the page. The results are located in the Headnote section.

You’ll find the searched words highlighted. In this case, “liberty to file afresh” is highlighted in paragraph (2).

Now scroll down to the translated section of the Headnote in particular paragraph (2) of the Malay version.

Viola! The Malay translation can be seen in para (2). I’ve highlighted the section for easy reference.

This method is faster than running to the library to grab a copy of the Kamus Istilah Undang-undang or even flipping through a dictionary. Also, the suggested translation do have some sort of authority since its from one of Malaysia’s reputable legal information service providers.

However, this little trick has its limitation. If the word does not appear in any of CLJ’s headnotes, you will not get the translation. However, based on my experience, most words, in particular legal jargon, are available

 Scroll to top